Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian basin
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Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian basin by Paul Edwin Potter

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Published by United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center in Morgantown [Kentucky?] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Geology, Stratigraphic -- Devonian,
  • Shale -- Appalachian Basin,
  • Sediments (Geology) -- Appalachian Basin

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Paul Edwin Potter, J. Barry Maynard, and Wayne A. Pryor
ContributionsMaynard, James B, Pryor, Wayne Arthur, Morgantown Energy Technology Center
The Physical Object
Paginationii, 43 p. :
Number of Pages43
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15476562M

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Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian basin by Paul Edwin Potter, unknown edition. The gas-bearing shales of the Appalachian Basin are chiefly of Middle and Late Devonian age with minor contributions from shales of Early Mississippian age. The Eastern Gas Shales Project () of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, ). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it. Abstract. Sedimentology of the Devonian shales and its relationship to gas, oil, and uranium are reported. Information about the gas bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin is organized in the following sections: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas oil, and uranium.

Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin Technical Report Potter, P E ; Maynard, J B ; Pryor, W A The Eastern Gas Shales Project () of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, ). The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Reference: Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin Maps showing location of stratigraphic cross sections and cored drill holes used in the study of the Devonian black.   From the outcrop belt, the Devonian shales increase in thickness towards southeastern Kentucky (up to ∼ m, ft thick) as they dip down into the subsurface in the Appalachian Basin. Present-day burial depths for the shale increase towards the southeast, reaching ∼ m ( ft) in southeastern Kentucky.

Assessment of undiscovered continuous gas resources in Upper Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin Province, Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable continuous resources of trillion cubic feet of natural gas in Upper Devonian shales of the. The Appalachian Mountains span across five geologic provinces (as defined by the USGS): the Appalachian Basin, the Blue Ridge Mountains, the Piedmont Province, the Adirondack Province, and the New England Province.. The Appalachian Basin. The Appalachian Basin is a foreland basin containing Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of Early Cambrian through Early Permian age.   The Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale was deposited in the Appalachian Basin of the North American Craton. The basin covered an area of about 48 × 10 4 km 2, and the Marcellus organic-rich shale had a distribution area of about × 10 4 km 2 (Kargbo et al., , Zhou et al., ). William A. Zagorski, Gregory R. Wrightstone, Douglas C. Bowman, "The Appalachian Basin Marcellus Gas Play: Its History of Development, Geologic Controls on Production, and Future Potential as a World-class Reservoir", Shale Reservoirs—Giant Resources for the 21 st Century, J. A. Breyer. Download citation file.